Exercise programs suitable for people with back pain

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Spinal pain research demonstrates the importance of the deep sensori-motor system in healthy postural and movement control of the trunk. When this deep muscle system is lazy and weak, the body compensates by over-engaging some of the large more superficial … Read More

Revisiting ‘a neutral spine’ – and why does it matter?

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A ‘neutral spine’ is deemed important – but it’s frequently only paid lip-service in clinical practice Are you clear what ‘a neutral spine’ means – and why it matters? The natural ’neutral’ spinal column has four curves when viewed in … Read More

The Fundamental Shoulder Patterns

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Most of us suffer from some stiffness in the neck and shoulders and ‘rotator cuff’ problems are becoming very common. Poor control of the shoulder girdle is always a problem. Try to get into the habit of doing these simple … Read More

Don’t underestimate the thorax when treating neck pain

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Successful treatment of neck pain also involves addressing the dysfunction in the thorax and shoulder girdle

The latest LBP and Pelvic pain research – a review of the 8th Interdisciplinary World Congress on Low Back and Pelvic Pain, Dubai, October 2013

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Get the low-down on the latest research into LBP and Pelvic pain – fascia; neuroplasticity and motor control; clinical subgrouping; breathing

Slump-sitting: Why choose to give yourself problems?

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HOW we sit is important for musculoskeletal health and general well-being. Slumping switches off your ‘core’ and is directly linked to pelvic and spinal pain.

Strengthening ‘the glutes’: helpful or harmful?

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With increasing importance placed on ‘strengthening the glutes’, the hunt for ‘the best glute exercises’ is evident.

‘Core’ matters

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Understanding the real role of ‘the core’ and how to properly retrain its function is important in ‘injury’ prevention and rehabilitation.

Re-examining the ‘bio’ in a biopsychosocial approach to the management of pain

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In the biopsychosocial model the ‘bio’ aspect risks being a poor relation to the psychosocial. How well do we understand and deal with it?

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Improve both your manual therapy and exercise prescription skills with our workshops